Kodak No. 2A Beau Brownie

The Kodak No. 2A Beau Brownie is the bigger sister of the No. 2 Beau Brownie and I am very happy to own one in each of the five available colors. Walter Dorwin Teague designed a lot of beautiful cameras for Kodak, but for me the Beau Brownie is his masterpiece.

All No. 2A Brownie boxes use 116 roll film for 6.5x11cm negatives, and this is where the problems start when you would like to take photographs with this kind of camera: 116 film is no longer available. But I figured out how to “create” rolls of 116 film the do it yourself way.

So here are some results from the first roll of film I used in the No. 2A Beau Brownie. The film is Rollei Ortho 25 developed in Rodinal. With 25 ISO I supose the speed of the Rollei Ortho is in the range of the film material used when the Beau Brownie hit the market in 1930. With the regular ~f/16 aperture of the Brownie it worked well on a sunny afternoon with the doublet lens producing nice pictures.

 

 

 

 

 

In case you own a camera which shoots 116 film and would like to use it to take photographs you might be interested in my article series on a 21st century 116 film workflow:

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Voigtländer Superb

The Superb is a 6×6 medium format TLR camera, introduced by Voigtländer in 1933 featuring a f/3.5 F=7.5cm Voigtländer Anastigmat Skopar in a Compur shutter with times from 1 sec. to 1/250 sec plus T and B.

Camera back
Camera back

Ergonomics of the camera are amazing, all settings from aperture to exposure time and focus distance can be modified by looking down the camera front from above.

Superb ergonomics
Superb ergonomics

A very interesting detail is how the shutter time setting is “projected” upwards to be visible from above: the time labels are in mirror writing when viewed from the front, a small prism reflects them to be readable from above.

Shutter time display
Shutter time display

The last feature I would like to mention is the parallax compensation of the viewfinder. The complete finder chamber including viewing lens and mirror is tilted downwards when the focus distance is reduced. This way the image in the viewfinder is as close to what the taking lens sees as possible.

Parallax compensation
Parallax compensation

A second model of the Superb followed in 1934 and in addition to the Skopar was also available with a f/3.5 Voigtländer Heliar. All features of the first model besides the lens remained the same. The only visible change were the strap connectors which replaced the strap “ears” of the first model.

China Time 2012
ADOX CHS 100 ART @100 ISO
ADOX APH 09 1+50 @9 min rotation
China Time 2012
ADOX CHS 100 ART @100 ISO
ADOX APH 09 1+50 @9 min rotation
Hamburg City Hall
ADOX CHS 100 ART @100 ISO
ADOX APH 09 1+50 @9 min rotation
Hamburg City Hall
ADOX CHS 100 ART @100 ISO
ADOX APH 09 1+50 @9 min rotation

Links:
http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Superb

Graflex Anniversary Speed Graphic 4×5

The Speed Graphic is a real icon in camera history and probably the most famous press camera ever. The first Speed Graphic cameras where produced by Graflex in Rochester, New York, in 1912. Production of later models continued until 1973. Until the mid-1960s a Speed Graphic was the standard equipment for many press photographers. Continue reading “Graflex Anniversary Speed Graphic 4×5”